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Think your perfume is old? Oregon State researchers beg to differ

Think your perfume is old? Oregon State researchers beg to differ

OREGON - Humans aren’t the only ones who find perfume and colognes attractive.

“This is a Laurel flower; notice, though, there are no petals, these are sepals, because back in those days the flowers didn't have petals,” Oregon State Researcher George Poinar says. “They had to use scents.”

He found evidence that floral scents have existed as far back as 100 million years ago.

“See those little droplets on it? Isn't that something,” he says.

So who might have been attracted to the smells back then?

The answer: dinosaurs.

Specifically, some herbivorous dinosaurs.

“I picked out this particular dinosaur because it lived when these flowers were blooming,” Poinar says.

He explains the ancient flowers attracted these dinosaurs mostly for food, but he doesn’t deny they probably enjoyed the smell.

“I went through all the dinosaur literature to search for olfactory abilities on them and things like that,” he says.

But today, the descendants of these extinct flowers serve as perfume and cologne ingredients for us humans today – such as Milkweed and Plumeria.

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