Oregon voters reject sanctuary status repeal, abortion initiative, grocery tax measure

FILE PHOTO (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon voters have decided to reject three contentious initiatives in Tuesday’s Midterm Election on the state’s sanctuary status, whether to ban state funding for abortions, and putting a stop on future taxes to groceries in the state’s constitution.

They also voted no on Measure 104, which looked to make it harder to raise taxes in the state.

The sole measure that was approved - Measure 102 - lets local governments use bond money for affordable housing projects.

Below are the initial results for each of the initiatives – check our results page for comprehensive coverage of each race across Oregon and SW Washington.

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MEASURE 102 - REMOVES RESTRICTIONS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING BONDS

Oregon voters have passed a measure that amends the state constitution to allow government entities to use revenue from affordable housing bonds toward public-private development partnerships.

Measure 102 was leading in returns Tuesday night.

The measure's passage will give city and county governments more flexibility to work with private developers and non-profit organizations when developing much-needed affordable housing projects.

Until now, the government entity that used bond revenue for affordable housing had to retain complete ownership of the project, which limited the size of projects and the ability to secure more federal tax credits.

The measure was referred to votes by state lawmakers with bipartisan support and there was no major opposition to it.

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MEASURE 103 - BAN ON GROCERY TAX

Voters are rejecting Measure 103.

The ballot initiative was aimed at amending the state constitution to ban any future taxes on groceries.

Supporters say they want politicians to “keep their hands off groceries.” The measure received millions of dollars in campaign support from grocery chains, as well as former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Opponents called the ban unnecessary in a state without sales tax, saying it would add a “broad, permanent, and untested tax loophole for specific corporations.

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MEASURE 104 -REQUIRES 3/5 LEGISLATIVE MAJORITY TO RAISE REVENUE

Oregon voters have rejected a measure that amends the state constitution to require a legislative supermajority for bills that raises revenue through tax exemptions, deductions, credits or fees.

The measure's failure means nothing changes.

Three-fifths of lawmakers in both legislative houses must approve bills that raise or impose new taxes but other ways of raising revenue -- such as trimming tax deductions -- still will only require a simple majority vote.

Those who opposed Measure 104 said it was an attempt to curb the power of Democrats, who currently hold the majority in both legislative houses.

Those in favor worried that state lawmakers would trim tax deductions and exemptions or increase fees to boost revenue.

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MEASURE 105 - REPEAL OREGON'S STATUS AS A SANCTUARY STATE

Oregonians have voted to reject a measure that would have repealed the state's sanctuary law.

This is a statute that has been on the books for more than thirty years. It was originally passed in 1987 to eliminate racial profiling in Oregon. It prohibits state and local resources from being used to enforce federal immigration law if the person’s only crime is being in this country illegally.

Supporters say Measure 105 will restore the rule of law. They say people who are in this country illegally are breaking the law.

Critics of Measure 105 say if it passes it could lead to an increase in harassment, civil rights violations and racial profiling.

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MEASURE 106 - BANS USE OF PUBLIC FUNDS FOR ABORTIONS

Oregonians voted against Measure 106, one of the most contentious and costly ballot measures for the state in November's election.

If passed, the measure would put a state constitutional ban on using public funds to pay for abortions.

There are strongly held opinions and beliefs on both sides.

Opponents of the measure say it is an attempt to infringe on women’s reproductive healthcare rights, while supporters say it will let voters determine whether their tax dollars will help fund abortions.


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