MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

'Ensuring disabled women and girls are leaders in their community': Mobility International

"We're sort of building an army of wild women, young disabled women leaders," said Susan Sygall, CEO of Mobility International. (SBG)

EUGENE, Ore. - Jenny Chinchilla is from El Salvador.

"I'm learning English to improve my skills and how to speak in front of the people, for example, like you," she said Thursday.

She's also an activist.

"There a lot of women around the world that are not enjoying in fullness the human rights," she said.

Jenny has been in a wheelchair since she was a child - and couldn't begin school in El Salvador until she was an adult.

"So I learn by myself with the help of my mother," she said. "That was not because I don't want to go to school, it's because of different barriers we have in El Salvador."

Now she wants to make sure all disabled women and girls in her country can attend school.

Through a non-profit in Eugene called Mobility International USA, Jenny and hundreds of other women across the world are coming to Eugene to learn how to become changemakers called "Wild".

"We're sort of building an army of wild women, young disabled women leaders," said Susan Sygall, CEO of Mobility International.

It's a 10-week program funded by scholarships from the community.

"We're giving the disabled women skills so they can make changes in community accessibility education ending violence against women and also ensuring disabled women and girls are leaders in their community," Sygall said.

There are nearly 500 million women and girls with disabilities on Earth.

Not all of them enjoy the same rights.

Jenny wants to make sure "that they have the experience and opportunity to development the same opportunity to support our country."

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending